Big League Umpshows Need to Stop

Umpires in Major League Baseball have a thankless job, as do umpires in the minor leagues, college, little league and so forth. Usually the only time you hear of them are when things go awry for one or both teams when calls are missed.

Last night was no different. In an interleague contest between the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals, home plate umpire Chris Segal called time just as Cards righty John Brebbia began his delivery. The ball sailed wildly because he attempted to stop his pitch, but just released the ball anyway. St. Louis catcher Yadier Molina immediately got up out of his crouch and began loudly voicing his displeasure with umpire Segal, as neither Molina nor Red Sox batter Eduardo Nunez called for time. Cardinals manager Mike Matheny quickly intervened to save Molina an early shower, pushing him back away from Segal. Matheny began arguing with Segal, and soon was boisterously thrown from the game by the young umpire. The Cardinals lost the game a few minutes later when Mookie Betts hit a two-run double, giving the Red Sox a walk-off win.

Back to Segal, who looks barely old enough to shave. It was bad enough that he called time when John Brebbia began his delivery, which could potentially cause an injury. More upsetting, Segal’s explanation for calling time was because “I needed a break”.

Really? Sheesh, that’s brutal.

In his postgame interview, Matheny said he told him, “Nobody is here to watch you.”

This isn’t a good look for MLB umpires. From the naked eye, it seems Segal is defiant and possibly trying to further bait Matheny and Molina.

In the past few weeks, umpires have been making headlines around Major League Baseball, and not for the right reasons. On July 26, Gerry Davis, normally a well-respected umpire, threw future Hall of Famer Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers out of their game that night because he moved the on-deck circle.

Umpire Davis told Beltre to move over to the on-deck circle because he didn’t like where he was standing. Beltre’s reason for being where he was, was to be in a safer spot to avoid being hit with a foul ball or a fragment of a broken bat. Needless to say, Beltre’s ejection didn’t go over well in the baseball world.

The next afternoon, July 27, the Blue Jays faced up against the Oakland A’s in Toronto. Home plate umpire Will Little tossed out manager John Gibbons for complaining about his inconsistent strike-zone in the top of the 5th inning. Blue Jays starter Marcus Stroman walked the next batter. After he got the ball back, he stepped off the rubber, and as he was rubbing up the ball he glanced at umpire Little, quickly ejected Stroman — apparently for looking at him. Jays catcher Russell Martin no sooner turned around to protest this and was also booted. Both Stroman and Martin were incredulous and had to be restrained before leaving for the clubhouse.

Did you think I wasn’t going to mention Angel Hernandez? Don’t be silly. Three days ago, Detroit Tigers 2nd baseman Ian Kinsler was batting against Martin Perez of the Rangers, when Hernandez ejected him in the middle of an at-bat — because he looked back at him after the second pitch.

Kinsler thought the first pitch of the at-bat, a very low pitch called a strike by Hernandez was a poor call (It was). Kinsler didn’t like the call but certainly didn’t make a scene. After being thrown out, Kinsler had his say, as did Tigers manager Brad Ausmus.

After the game, Kinsler was quoted by the Detroit Free Press as saying of Hernandez: “It has to do with changing the game. He’s changing the game. He needs to find another job, he really does.”

Stinging comments, but he’s right. If you look, there is data supporting Hernandez’s poor performance over more than 25 years of umpiring at the major league level.

Major League Baseball really needs to reign in some of these guys and explain to them that fans don’t pay to watch umpires call games. No one is there to see them. I agree with what Ian Kinsler said, that games are being unnecessarily being altered.

I have always thought that the best umpires are ones fans never hear of. MLB would be better off if they weed out the “big names” and replace them with guys we don’t know of.

Related: Not a Good Night for MLB Umpires

Advertisements

$86,000,000 Mistake?

In a past article, I wrote about New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and the great moves he has made. I continue to have faith in his deals and the future of this team.

I am not sure signing Aroldis Chapman to a 5 year/86 million dollar deal is one of them. After last night’s loss to the Boston Red Sox, many Yankees fans were shaking their heads after a tough defeat. Chapman entered the game in the top of the 9th inning and quickly disposed of Hanley Ramirez on three pitches – fastballs clocked at 100, 102 and 102.

The next man up was 20 year-old rookie sensation Rafael Devers. Chapman, ever so proud of his heater, pumped two fastballs by Devers. By this time, the excited crowd at Yankee Stadium was buzzing, as all of Chapman’s pitches were 100 mph and above. The third pitch, also a fastball — a 102.8 mph fastball — was right down the middle and the baby-faced rookie barreled it up well enough to put it over the wall to tie the game. The excited crowd quickly grew quiet, like letting the air out of a balloon.

Chapman finished the inning without further problems, and went back out for the tenth inning. After quickly striking out Mitch Moreland, Jackie Bradley, Jr. was hit by an errant fastball and the following batter, Eduardo Núñez walked and by that time, Joe Girardi came out to hook Chapman. Reliever Tommy Kahnle later gave up a hit to score JBJ with the deciding run.

Illustrated below are Red Sox hitters’ numbers vs. Chapman in 2017. The numbers aren’t pretty. An on base percentage of .484, nine walks and six strikeouts.

Screenshot (111)

As Dennis Eckersley might say, “YUCK!” I’m pretty sure Brian Cashman, Joe Girardi and all Yankees fans didn’t have this in mind when Chapman put his signature on that five year contract. A top-flight closer is supposed to lock down games against division rivals in the heat of a pennant race, not wilt like flowers in a dry, hot summer. But Girardi reiterated in his postgame interview, “Chapman is my closer”.

As if his performance alone wasn’t bad enough, it appeared Chapman smirked in response to a reporter’s question asking how frustrating this stretch of less than ideal outings has been for him. It’s roughly around the 1:10 mark in the video in the link below, courtesy of YES Network.

I can understand that players might find some questions dumb, annoying and any other adjective you want to use. In my humble opinion, losing a tough game to a division opponent is not a great time to laugh/smirk/whatever. I guess we better get used to it, because Chapman is here for the duration.

It’s a Sonny Day in Cleveland

We’re a few days past the MLB trade deadline and the dust is settling around the league. The New York Yankees made a few impact trades before the deadline and the team has already benefited from their additions.

Tonight, Sonny Gray takes the mound for his Yankees debut against the Indians in Cleveland, and Twitter is already abuzz in anticipation.

The weather forecast in Cleveland is calling for scattered thunderstorms, but in Yankees Universe it’s officially “Sonny”.

See ya next time! 😎