Dreaming of The Game

I’m sitting here on Thursday afternoon, looking outside at the trees covered with a thin layer of ice. It’s a far cry from the beautiful 63 degree day we had in Rochester, NY only three days prior. The week before that, we had blizzard conditions with wind-chill temps in the minus-twenties. This winter has seemed to go on forever and have more personalities than Sybil, and it’s still only the end of the first week of February.

Despite Old Man Winter being firmly parked here across the United States, I’m dreaming of warm temperatures and baseball.

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I took this photo at PNC Field in Moosic, PA last July 4, when I went to a game between the Buffalo Bisons and the Scranton Wilkes Barre RailRiders. I’ll describe this scene as I remember it. It rained and stormed most of the afternoon, but it all cleared out about an hour before I took this photo, taking the humidity with it. It was a pleasant 72 degrees, the air and grass smelled fresh and the smell of popcorn and hot-dogs were in the air. The PA system was playing upbeat music and there was a buzz of excitement in the crowd because New York Yankees starter Masahiro Tanaka (on rehab assignment) was the RailRiders starting pitcher this day. Tanaka pitched well, allowing a pair of runs over five innings in a 4-2 win over Buffalo.

Spring training begins next week, with exhibition games beginning within a couple weeks. It’s still cold outside, but us baseball die-hards are most of the way through the darkness of the off-season. In the meantime, I’ll just enjoy the smells and sounds of the ballparks. 😎🌭🍿⚾

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Finesse Pitchers: A Lost Art

A couple weeks ago, I bought tickets to watch my local minor league team, the Rochester Red Wings play the Norfolk Tides in a doubleheader. Norfolk won both games, each by a score of 1-0. Obviously both games were well-pitched affairs, with runs at a premium.

In the first game, Norfolk had a tall lefty on the mound by the name of John Means. As I watched him in the 1st inning, I noticed he didn’t throw all that hard, sitting about 87-88 mph with his fastball. He mixed in a curve and a change, and seemed to command all three pitches. Means went on to breeze through the Red Wings lineup and never got into trouble, effectively shutting them down. He pitched a three-hit shutout, struck out six and walked no one. His fastest pitch of the day reached 89 mph. He painted like Picasso against a Rochester lineup that had six players who played in the major leagues at one time or another. It really was enjoyable to watch.

 

Before that day, July 19, I never heard of John Means. He’s 25 years old, 6’3″, 230 lbs. and was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 11th round of the 2014 draft from West Virginia. As of this writing, Means has started 15 games in Triple-A, with a record of 5-3, an ERA of 3.25 and a WHIP of 1.2. Decent numbers, but not eye-popping. After watching him pitch in person and reading his overall career stats, he can throw strikes and he can strike people out. These minor league stats show that he’s always been able to do both regularly. So why are the pitching starved Orioles not taking a look at this guy in the big leagues? He’s not in their Top 30 minor league prospects, probably more suspect than prospect. Means is not even on their 40 man roster.

With everyone from fans to front office executives to MLB league executives in love with the velocity craze, I worry guys like Means may never get a fair shot to prove their worth in the major leagues. Guys who throw (not necessarily pitch) at 95 or better seem to get fast-tracked to the big leagues, while the finesse pitchers seem to get left out in the cold, ending up minor league filler. Greg Maddux and Jamie Moyer, both drafted by the Cubs in 1984, recorded 624 big league wins between them, logging over 9,000 combined innings. Neither one of these men would probably get a second look in today’s MLB. Each of them made incredibly good livings for many years with fastballs that rarely, if ever touched 90 miles per hour. They learned to pitch because they had no choice, and they won a lot of games as a result. Same with Trevor Hoffman, who survived and thrived on an 86 mph fastball and a deadly change-up. He went into the Hall of Fame mere days ago, having saved more than 600 games over his long career. With relievers throwing near 100 mph, it would to envision him even getting a shot if he were a young pitcher in today’s game.

Maddux, Moyer and Hoffman are just a few examples, but there are many more who pitched with lower velocities and won many games. Tom Glavine comes to mind. Flame throwing pitchers and strikeouts seem to draw fans in, and more fans equals more attention, which can bring more revenue. Everyone loves the oohs and ahhs. But there should be room for pitchers like John Means. Finesse pitching doesn’t have to be a lost art.